Watch Online Now

| | | | |

Stephen Pace: Maine Master

Sep 2009 | Posted by:

2008 | Directed by Richard Kane

Stephen Pace: Maine Master is part of a series of documentaries about Maine artists. Pace, who spent extended summers in the fishing village of Stonington, Maine, spent 50 years as a second generation abstract expressionist in New York after WWII where he met Gertrude Stein and Pablo Picasso. On the GI Bill in Mexico he met and became a protégé of American painter Milton Avery. Upon moving to New York City he found himself in the swim of the art world making friends with Franz Kline, Jackson Pollack, and Hans Hofmann amongst others. The Whitney Museum accepted his work in their Biennials seven times. This film chronicles Pace and his wife Pam’s last days in Maine closing his studio and summer home while being celebrated by neighbors and the community that loved them most.

| | | | |

The Five:Fifteen

Sep 2009 | Posted by:

2009 | Directed by Chris Chiusano

Inspired by director Chris Chiusano’s countless hours commuting on the train, this film began as a series of opposite-hand drawings. The animation created is a compilation of individual hand-drawn images that have been brought to life through the computer.

| | | | |

The Other Way Out

Sep 2009 | Posted by:

2008 | Directed by Tristan Dyer

The Other Way Out is the story of how one woman escaped a 15-year addiction to opiates. Narrated by herself, she recalls the experience of her addiction and the use of a controversial method of recovery called Ibogaine, which is illegal in the United States. Her tale is illustrated through stop-motion animation and time-lapse photography.

| | | | |

White Elephants

Sep 2009 | Posted by:

2008 | Directed by Chris Portal

White Elephants is a sensitive, slice-of-life story involving a young couple going through the normal course of their day, while coming to terms with an unexpected medical diagnosis. The film is a reflection on the unfortunate hardships that can befall any couple, the decisions we are sometimes forced to make, and the ability to support one another as best as one knows how.