Animation

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Yellow Dress

Sep 2020 | Posted by:

Directed by Kristen Johnson

Riss Goodwin is mother, wife, and a reinvented actress who resumes her dreams to get to Hollywood and become a famous actress. She is therefore excited to audition for Medea the Musical in Chinatown, an avant garde iteration with music. However with in-laws coming in five hours with a two hour audition process, counting traffic, she is severely pressed for time.

As she jumps into her work she hears “the wheels on the bus go round and round” and her world alters and she grows younger and younger. In this undesired memory, Riss becomes the child version of herself, Rachel. Rachel and her brother Sang Duk are paid off to be owned by an orphanage. The children scream for their father and the musicality of the screams push Rachel back to reality and Riss’s is surreal. Her eyes land on on the “wheels on the bus.” Riss fiercely turns the program off. She knows she must stay on task.

She looks around the house and grows sick by the mess a toddler can create. But with love for both her husband and son, she does her best to tidy up. Once she enters into Hosu’s (meaning lake in Korean) playroom, she grows envious by the abundance of his toys, books, and play items. She locates a book given to her at her baby shower, titled: BiBimBop – a Korean rice dish and takes a moment to read. She wants to wean away her ghosts.

However as she moves through the pages, she is jerked inside another memory. This time a ghastly series of events leave her naked with black and blue eyes. She is crying and in severe pain. Riss remembers this moment vividly. A friendly outcast brings Rachel clothes and carries her out.

We see Rachel shortly afterwards, staring in a mirror looking at herself in a ripped, tattered and stained yellow dress. She utters yellow dress, growing happier with each utterance. She smiles. Rachel sees herself for the very first time.

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City of Sin

Sep 2020 | Posted by:

City of Sin
2018 | Directed by Juliana Gallant

A film that shines light on a city left in the dark.

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Singing in the Dark Times

Sep 2020 | Posted by:

Singing in the Dark Times
2020 | Directed by Alan Magee

The song Singing in the Dark Times was written in December 2016, a month after the presidential election. America had just taken a momentous turn—one that would affect not only social policy but also the temper of the nation. What concerned me then, and does now, is how we, individually and collectively, should respond to powerful, destructive forces. How do we hold on to our personal guidelines for decency when facing a daunting malevolence? I felt compelled to write a song about that, and in my search for a central metaphor I remembered the short poem, Motto, by Bertolt Brecht:

“In the dark times, will there also be singing?
Yes, there will be singing about the dark times.”

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City of Sin

Sep 2020 | Posted by:

2018 | Directed by Juliana Gallant

Experimental animated short from Raw Art Works student Juliana Gallant. City of Sin was a finalist for the Shoots! Youth Prize for an outstanding film by a filmmaker seventeen or under at Rabbit Heart Poetry Film Festival 2018.

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Downhill

Sep 2020 | Posted by:

2018 | Directed by Erica Moriconi

Four plagued neighbors resort to self destruction when their decaying apartment intends to drag its residents down with it.

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Out of the Shadows

Sep 2020 | Posted by:

Out of the Shadows
2019 | Directed by Aidan Pavia, Bradley Nicosia & Louvriel Barrios

Where there is light, there will be shadows.

A group of young animators explore their relationships with their shadow side.

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Liberty and Justice: A Cautionary Tale in the Land of the Free

Sep 2018 | Posted by:

2018 | Directed by Salley Mavor and Rob Goldsborough

What happens when a pair of lost citizens wander in the deep dark woods in search of a leader? In this satirical take of the traditional folktale, “Hansel and Gretel”, the wordless story follows protagonists Liberty and Justice as they negotiate the challenges of today’s unique political landscape, while being shadowed by a persistent Twitter bird.

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The Reflection In Me

Sep 2018 | Posted by:

You are perfectly perfect just the way you are! Marc Colagiovanni, an attorney based in Rhode Island, has a positive message to share with the world. The new filmmaker approached FableVision Studios to help him produce an animated version of his story The Reflection in Me. The film’s goal is to empower children of all ages to find the courage to look inside and love themselves as they are.

With FableVision founder and renowned children’s book author Peter H. Reynolds at the helm as illustrator and executive producer, The Reflection in Me follows the impactful experience of a child going through the practice of self-love and acceptance. The film seeks to promote the message of having a positive self-image and unconditional love.

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Swimming Into Darkness

Sep 2017 | Posted by:

2016 | Directed by Keith Boynton

An orphaned astronaut goes on a journey to discover the true nature of the universe in this epic, evocative animated short.

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The Something

Sep 2016 | Posted by:

2015 | Directed by Tom Babbitt

The Something is an animated re-imagining of a children’s classic by Natalie Babbitt, beloved author of Tuck Everlasting. Fully drawn, scored, edited and voiced by her son, Tom Babbitt—an animator, artist, filmmaker and musician living in New England. In the story, a monster boy lays awake at night, frightened that “something” will come through his window. He turns his weird little world upside down in his dogged search to understand and confront his fear – which he finds, in a way, through the “looking glass…”