2012 Online New England Film Festival

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In Danger of Being Discovered

1 Sep , 2012 | Posted by:

In Danger of Being Discovered
2011 | Directed by Marc Dole, Michael Venn

In Danger of Being Discovered takes a retrospective look at the rise of the music scene in the picturesque seacoast city of Portsmouth, NH during its Seattle-like musical peak in the mid 90’s. This was a time when local bands were king, live music venues flourished and it wasn’t a question of if you were going out to see a band, but rather which local band you were seeing and where. Portsmouth, NH was being hailed by the Boston media as the next Seattle musical sensation, where at least 5 of the 55+ local bands were being courted by major record labels, consistently selling out shows, out-requesting national acts on the radio and some even selling over 60,000 copies of their demo CD. This was a time when the music seemed like it was on the verge of exploding and catapulting the bands, and the scene that spawned them, to legendary success… but somehow the scene never managed to get the notoriety it deserved.

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The Ministry of the Stove

1 Sep , 2012 | Posted by:

2011 | Directed by Finn Yarbrough, Katherine Yarbrough

Quaker tradition has it that meetings are held together on Sundays, collectively asking for the Holy Spirit to enter the sanctuary created by communal silence. The South Starksboro Meeting House is the oldest continually used Quaker church in Vermont: Quakers have worshipped here each Sunday in silence for 186 years. So in the wintertime when the fire is stoked in the center of the candle-lit and un-heated church, the ministry that they take is said to be “the ministry of the stove.”

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Baby Blue

1 Sep , 2012 | Posted by:

Baby Blue
2012 | Directed by James Poirier and Travis Tyler

Set on the unforgiving Maine coast, Baby Blue follows the journey of a father delving into the nature of closure and fulfilling promises.

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It Is What It Is

1 Sep , 2012 | Posted by:

2011 | Directed by VP Boyle

A modern day contemporary movie musical with a completely original score, It Is What It Is explores the lives of seven young New Yorkers during a twenty-four hour period of near misses, tattered relationships and crumbling dreams.

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The Passenger

1 Sep , 2012 | Posted by:

The Passenger
2009 | Directed by Julie Zammarchi

A woman travels in a car toward her own death. Along the way memories, visions, and a couple of talking animals crowd her consciousness. The film is a ride through the disparate images of her mind’s eye and a quest to piece together her life’s meaning.

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BirthMarkings

1 Sep , 2012 | Posted by:

BirthMarkings
2011 | Directed by Margaret Lazarus

Twelve women explore how their bodies have been transformed by giving birth. We see body images and hear their voices. They talk to us from their bodies. We hear and see their ambivalence, humor and love. The film began when I learned that one of the fastest growing plastic surgeries was the post-birth tummy tuck. I thought about what it meant that we want to erase the signs that we have delivered children. I was driven to create a film that reframes and destabilizes our reactions to a woman’s body after she has given birth. The film builds on the tradition of body artists like Carolee Schneeman and Ana Mendieta, who used the transgressive presentation of violence and eroticism to shock and challenge. In “BirthMarkings” we chose to explore what one of the women in the film called the “public reaction of disgust and horror” to images of her post birth belly. In a nip-tuck driven culture that is inured to violence and erotica; a culture in which babies are often seen as the latest accessory, what is transgressive is the image of a woman’s abdomen that is not taut, and unmarked by birth. “Birthmarkings” challenges the static, commodified images that are everywhere in our public culture and define what is beautiful and visually acceptable. We refocus on the beauty, dynamism and lived experiences of the marks of birth. We become engaged in the tension between the dynamic and the static and the natural world and the commodity.

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Kids of the World

1 Sep , 2012 | Posted by:

2011 | Directed by Craig Saddlemire

With the snap of her fingers, Binto can defy the laws of nature. She can do everything from transporting her friends to instantly commanding a thunderstorm. Okay… maybe that’s just her imagination. But in Kennedy Park, kids are not constrained by the conventions of reality. Kids of the World features 11 young people who once lived in Africa, Puerto Rico, and elsewhere in the United States, who now find themselves in Lewiston, Maine, sharing one communal park. The kids were invited to make up stories – some based on their personal lives, some completely fictional – and then discuss, reenact, and perform these stories on the big screen. 11 Kids, 4 Stories, 1 Park. Part documentary and part fantasy, Kids of the World is all fun.

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Thule

1 Sep , 2012 | Posted by:

Thule
2011 | Directed by Robert Scott Wildes

In 1962 a group of young men, who are stationed at a remote Air Force base in Greenland, band together to undergo a dangerous mission to retrieve mail lost in a frozen landscape of darkness.

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Buddy Love

1 Sep , 2012 | Posted by:

2011 | Directed by Todd J. Lajoie

When Walter, animal-enthusiast, comes home to find his dog missing, he and his dim-witted friends take the case into their own irresponsible hands. Armed with unintelligible determination and enthusiasm, these friends steadily ruin every clue they come across on their journey to find Walter’s dog.

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Neighbors

1 Sep , 2012 | Posted by:

Neighbors
2012 | Directed by Judd Cherry

Have you ever been in a competition with a friend or neighbor? Well Timothy Longshanks has been for years. And now he’s on a mission to win that competition no matter what the cost. But his unaware, gentle-giant of a neighbor, Big Al, always has what Tim just got, or better. A journey of one-upmanship ensues, leading Tim to the far corners of the world and back again. His mania ultimately leads him down a path of no return, ending in hilariously disastrous results. Heard the expression “Keeping up with the Joneses”? For Tim, it’s “The Joneses can suck it.”