Vermont

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Motel

Sep 2011 | Posted by:

2010 | Directed by William Peters

After a long day of driving, Brad and Roger decide to pull into a motel on a dark stretch of New Hampshire road. When they ask for a room, they think they can catch a bargain…
What they get are three motels, each one stranger than the last. Something bizarre is happening, and they’re not sure why. Is something being lost in translation, or is this place just not as it seems? They never thought something so easy could seem this impossible.

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Respect for Acting

Sep 2010 | Posted by:

2010 | Directed by Richard Waterhouse

A frustrated acting teacher struggles to spark passion in his inexperienced students.

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Backwater

Sep 2010 | Posted by:

2009 | Directed by Michael Fisher

A man released from prison is shadowed by a figure from his past, forcing him to question whether he can ever be free.

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God Hates…

Sep 2010 | Posted by:

2009 | Directed by Graham Raubvogel

God Hates… explores the Westboro Baptist Church’s visit to Vermont to protest gays, Jews, Catholics, and pretty much anyone that’s not them. Through a diverse set of interviewees, a unique contrast of experienced and youthful perspectives are offered on First Amendment privileges, social activism, and the “correct” response to this vehement hate speech.

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Stephen Pace: Maine Master

Sep 2009 | Posted by:

2008 | Directed by Richard Kane

Stephen Pace: Maine Master is part of a series of documentaries about Maine artists. Pace, who spent extended summers in the fishing village of Stonington, Maine, spent 50 years as a second generation abstract expressionist in New York after WWII where he met Gertrude Stein and Pablo Picasso. On the GI Bill in Mexico he met and became a protégé of American painter Milton Avery. Upon moving to New York City he found himself in the swim of the art world making friends with Franz Kline, Jackson Pollack, and Hans Hofmann amongst others. The Whitney Museum accepted his work in their Biennials seven times. This film chronicles Pace and his wife Pam’s last days in Maine closing his studio and summer home while being celebrated by neighbors and the community that loved them most.