How To's | Screenplay Doctor | Screenwriting

Screenplay Doctor: Agent Calling

31 Jul , 2010  

Written by Susan Kouguell | Posted by:

Getting the call, email, or snail mail letter that an agent has requested to read your work is great news… but don’t lose your common sense. The Screenplay Doctor outlines your next step.

Getting the call, email, or snail mail letter that an agent has requested to read your work is great news…but don’t lose your common sense. Keep in mind that just because an agent has expressed interest in your work, you should not jump into a relationship without making sure the agent is a good match for you.

Here is a question I get on a regular basis: Can you provide some guidelines on how a screenwriter can choose the ‘right’ agent to represent his or her script?

An agent should have a good reputation, strong integrity, and real connections in the film industry. Do your research and find out about the agent and/or agency. The prospective agent must understand your work, and share your sensibility and vision. If he or she doesn’t really understand you and your work, this relationship will not benefit either one of you and in the end, it will be a waste of time. And finally, an agent must respond positively to your expectations about the agent/client relationship.

Trust your instincts to determine if the potential agent is the best person to champion your work. This is a business relationship, so do not be intimidated to ask questions. It is acceptable to ask prospective agents whom they represent; they should be forthcoming regarding their client list. It’s most beneficial if the agent represents clients who are working steadily; this is a positive reflection on the agent’s ability and their clout in the film industry. It is also acceptable to ask prospective agents how many writers they represent. If the ratio of writers to agents is high, (such as more than 50 writers to one agent), than you might want to question whether this is the right agent or agency for you.

To learn more about agents and how to find the elusive agent, please read my past columns for this publication, as well as in my book The Savvy Screenwriter: How to Sell Your Screenplay (and Yourself) Without Selling Out! www.su-city-pictures.com; www.su-city-pictures.blogspot.com

You can follow my Su-City Pictures, LLC Facebook fan page and SKouguell Twitter page to receive more Savvy Tips about how to write, structure, and sell your screenplay.


To learn more about agents and how to find the elusive agent, please read my past columns for this publication, as well as in my book The Savvy Screenwriter: How to Sell Your Screenplay (and Yourself) Without Selling Out! www.su-city-pictures.com; www.su-city-pictures.blogspot.com You can follow my Su-City Pictures, LLC Facebook fan page and SKouguell Twitter page to receive more Savvy Tips about how to write, structure, and sell your screenplay.