Company/Organization Profiles | Film School & Education | Massachusetts

Fostering Tech-Savvy Filmmakers

1 Aug , 2000  

Written by Alex Rapp | Posted by:

The New Harbor Media Institute in Beverly, MA opens its doors to create a learning environment for the modern filmmaker.

The North Shore, Massachusetts is the unlikely home to a brand new film and video education center, which has opened it’s doors this summer to students interested in high-tech production.

The New Harbor Media Institute combines the production expertise of Beverly, MA based Counterproductions with the facilities at Endicott College. The Institute aims to bring hands-on workshops with a major focus on learning new, digital production techniques. Digital video and computer-based editing are two common threads throughout the different New Harbor workshops. Students so far have ranged from aspiring filmmakers to area dot-com professionals to people simply looking to gain a better knowledge of the lost-cost production possibilities of new digital video technology.

The highlight of New Harbor’s remaining summer program is a week-long event titled "Convergence: The Future of Film, TV and the Web," running August 6 through 11. It begins with a clambake reception on Sunday, featuring guest panelists from Media 100, Panasonic, and several other companies, where discussion will center on the computerized future of television. Then, during the week, participants will choose among an evening workshop curriculum either in basic digital video, or HDTV. The week ends with a Saturday spent learning different ways to put video on the Internet. Participants can sign up for this program in its entirety or for a single part.

"Convergence is today’s reality," says Reed, "but it’s not often taught that way. Traditional college courses still present film and video separately. Our courses reflect the real world, where tools and techniques are constantly changing.

According to Ted Reed, CEO of Counterproductions, all of the New Harbor workshops are designed to give students hands-on experience working on real projects. For example, members of the July "Fusion Film Workshop" conceptualized and shot actual scenes for a pilot program on the history of prohibition for the Learning Channel. Reed asserts this method adds an extra element to the class experience. Not only are basic skills conveyed, but also real world situations, like the pressures of working under a deadline, and understanding how to please a client.

Planning is currently underway for fall workshops, possibly including a three-day hands-on editing seminar, and workshops in After Effects and Photoshop. All courses are available for personal enrichment or college credit, and teachers are area film professionals.

"It’s the future of media studies," says Reed.

For more information visit www.newharbormedia.com or contact the New Harbor Media Institute at 978-921-7177. In it’s 22-year history, Counterproductions has won 13 Emmy awards for various documentaries and television productions. Their 1989 documentary about a Washington, DC debutante cotillion, smartly entitled ‘Coming Out’ was featured at the Sundance Film Festival. Current projects include two Learning Channel pilots, and completing the Richard Broadman documentary project ‘Brownsville, Black and White,’ which explores the post-war history of a racially troubled Brooklyn community.


For more information visit www.newharbormedia.com or contact the New Harbor Media Institute at 978-921-7177. In it’s 22-year history, Counterproductions has won 13 Emmy awards for various documentaries and television productions. Their 1989 documentary about a Washington, DC debutante cotillion, smartly entitled 'Coming Out' was featured at the Sundance Film Festival. Current projects include two Learning Channel pilots, and completing the Richard Broadman documentary project 'Brownsville, Black and White,' which explores the post-war history of a racially troubled Brooklyn community.